No Black Pete List

5 Dec

Personally, I boycott all the stores that have zwarte piet (black pete) on display. If the owners of the stores do not have the decency to not offend me as a customer, then they are in no need of my money. I am not paranoid about it, if I discover the display too late, or if I am dependent on one item from that store, I will not throw a tantrum. I will just make sure that I figure out where else to find the article. Thus, I protest with my money.

The stores that display black pete I will avoid from then on. I will actively think of other stores to buy my stuff from. The open racism only goes partly underground until the next year. I have taught myself not to be dependent on sick people. Stores that show improve the next year, that is, they skip the ridicule and respect all customers, I may shop at again. But, I keep my eyes open. They fall back into ridicule then they will not see me again.

This year there were notably more shops restricting themselves to images of Sinterklaas without black pete. Several of the bigger chain stores no longer had offensive images in the shop windows. Some chain stores did print the offensive images in their brochures or on advertising displays hidden away somewhere in the store.

Black Pete Short List 2011

Azzuro (shoes)
Computerland (computers)
Dirx (alcohol)
Douglas (perfume)
Kijkshop (cheap appliances)
Kruidvat (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals)
Lidl (supermarket)
Scheltema Selexyz (books)

A lot of small store owners still choose to display offensive black pete dolls.

Examples of stores where offensive black pete images were on display can be added as a comment.

 

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One Response to “No Black Pete List”

  1. No Black Pete July 26, 2013 at 10:50 am #

    Boycott[boi-kot]
    verb (used with object)
    1. to combine in abstaining from, or preventing dealings with, as a means of intimidation or coercion: to boycott a store.
    2. to abstain from buying or using: to boycott foreign products.
    noun
    3. the practice of boycotting.
    4. an instance of boycotting.

    Origin:

    After Charles C. Boycott (1832–97), English estate manager in Ireland, against whom nonviolent coercive tactics were used in 1880.

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